An opacification of the crystalline lens of the eye that frequently results in visual impairment or blindness. Opacities vary in morphology, are often confined to a portion of the lens, and may be static or progressive. In general, the more posteriorly located and dense an opacity, the greater the impact on visual function. CTRCT21 includes cerulean and pulverulent cataracts. Cerulean cataracts are characterized by peripheral bluish and white opacifications organized in concentric layers with occasional central lesions arranged radially. The opacities are observed in the superficial layers of the fetal nucleus as well as the adult nucleus of the lens. Involvement is usually bilateral. Visual acuity is only mildly reduced in childhood. In adulthood, the opacifications may progress, making lens extraction necessary. Histologically the lesions are described as fusiform cavities between lens fibers which contain a deeply staining granular material. Although the lesions may take on various colors, a dull blue is the most common appearance and is responsible for the designation cerulean cataract. Pulverulent cataracts are characterized by a dust-like, 'pulverised' appearance of the opacities which can be found in any part of the lens. In some cases cataract is associated with microcornea without any other systemic anomaly or dysmorphism. Microcornea is defined by a corneal diameter inferior to 10 mm in both meridians in an otherwise normal eye.

Name Development Level Target Family
Name Description
TCRDv4.6.9
UniProt Disease