An autosomal dominant hemolytic anemia characterized by primary erythrocyte dehydration. DHS erythrocytes exhibit decreased total cation and potassium content that are not accompanied by a proportional net gain of sodium and water. DHS patients typically exhibit mild to moderate compensated hemolytic anemia, with an increased erythrocyte mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and a decreased osmotic fragility, both of which reflect cellular dehydration. Patients may also show perinatal edema and pseudohyperkalemia due to loss of potassium from red cells stored at room temperature. A minor proportion of red cells appear as stomatocytes on blood films. Complications such as splenomegaly and cholelithiasis, resulting from increased red cell trapping in the spleen and elevated bilirubin levels, respectively, may occur. The course of DHS is frequently associated with iron overload, which may lead to hepatosiderosis.

Name Development Level Target Family
Name Description
TCRDv4.6.9
UniProt Disease